Tribes Without Passports, People without States

Click on the link below for a stimulating post from a sharp and thought-provoking WordPress blog. I love any attempt to come up with new thinking and this endeavours to break up the consensual log-jam. Its idealism reminds me of my first ever post, which I present below as a naïve introduction.

My voyage of exploration begins. I want to recapture the spirit of childhood, when we would set out from home with the deliberate aim of getting hopelessly lost. No point in going over old ground, after all.

Source: Tribes Without Passports, People without States

A Pat on the Back

My blog is a few months old and I have just received a nomination for The Blogger Recognition Award. I would like to thank T. Wayne of A Joyful Process for this. Click on the blog title in the previous sentence to view his many thoughtful, varied and readable posts.

The rules for this award are very specific:

1. Select 15 other blogs you want to give the award to

2. You cannot nominate yourself or the person who has nominated you.

3. Write a post to show your award.

4. Give a brief story of how your blog started.

5. Give a piece of advice or two to new bloggers.

6. Thank whoever nominated you and provide a link to their blog.

7. Attach the award badge to the post (right click and save, then upload.)

8. Comment on each blog and let them know you have nominated them.

9. Provide a link  to the original post on Edge of Night 

For #9, click the name above. For the rest, here goes …

I started my blog because I was looking for something a little deeper than Facebook. Don’t get me wrong, I love splashing about in the shallow end but I like to get out of my depth sometimes. How else will I know if I can swim?

I try to be adventurous and not worry too much about my image or ‘niche-appeal’. To be fair, a narrow focus may suit some bloggers but I prefer to be unconstrained – at least until I discover an authentic writing voice.

I view blogging as a global writers’ collective, an inspiring stage in humanity’s lurch towards cultural evolution. I often comment on other posts, partly as a way of building my own readership but also because blogging is a two-way thing – a dialogue between like minds.

My own nominations seem to share these ideals and values. I search for satire, reflection, laughter, passion, insight, sharing – here are a few of the blogs where I find them .  I’m following 128 sites and many of them are no less rewarding than these, so please accept my apology if yours isn’t here:

garfieldhug.wordpress.com

problemswithinfinity.com

opherworld.wordpress.com

thetroublesometraveller.com

storytimewithjohn.com

publikworks.wordpress.com

nebusresearch.wordpress.com

eddiestarblog.wordpress.com

stevehigginslive.com

thenicessist.com

bensbitterblog.com

sillyoldsod.com

stephellaneous.wordpress.com

echoesfromthepath.com

entertishworld.com

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Please let me know if I’ve got anything wrong. A post like this stretches the cyberskills of an old codger like me!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Night on a Bare Mountain

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There comes a point in every life online

When laughter dies. We sense the biting storm

That others feel beyond our virtual home.

The dispossessed cry O for such a voice

But we fall silent, waiting for their word.

The question, my friend, is trembling on their lips –

Our answer still blowing in the wind.

 

(with apologies to Bob Dylan and the multitudes even he failed)

Dave Kingsbury

 

100 word story challenge

Hello?

Is this Mr Shoehorn?

Yes.

I’m Asphodel from Fifteen Minutes. You may have heard of us.

You make people famous.

Our computer has selected your name. Our image consultants are now available. Our broadcasting studio is ready to roll.

That lot won’t come cheap.

It won’t cost you a penny. We take half your earnings when you become famous.

What if, for all your expertise, I turn out to be a flop?

Many of our clients are famous for being flops. People adore pointless celebrity. It gives them hope.

Win-win, then?

It’s all good, yeah, all good … you in?

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Subversion, 60’s Style …

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What chance did we stand? Comic strips like this and the Bash Street Kids – see the previous post for my favourite adventure – introduced us Brit baby-boomers to surreal satire of conventional thinking. In the States it was Mad Magazine … were we the world’s luckiest ever generation, I wonder?

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Share the fun, kids, it’s still being published! And here’s one for Opher, whose blog opherworld.wordpress.com I can thoroughly recommend … some more artwork to die for!

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The Kids Are All Right

One of the Bash Street Kids spots a poster – Modern Art Competition, Big Money Prizes. He tells the others and their ‘thinks’ bubbles show all the grub they’ll buy with their winnings. They set about creating a masterpiece along American Expressionist lines.

They lay a huge canvas on the floor and splash paint on it, even ride bicycles over it. The result is very Jackson Pollock, all lines and swirls and splodges. They take the painting to the gallery but find it won’t fit through the door.

End of story you might think, but no, the last frame shows their cunning solution. They have cut the painting into three separate pieces and each one has a rosette attached – first, second and third place in the competition. Their dreams of food now run amok and the comic strip ends in an explosion of ‘thinks’ bubbles with a delicious profusion of jelly, sausage and mash, pies, cakes … what you might call a Beano!

I’ve looked online but can’t find it. Perhaps it’s better left in my memory, two pages that have everything: visual humour, satire, teamwork, rebellion, social comment … best of all, it’s kids putting their heads together to outwit the daft adult world.

What’s not to like?

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Grumpy Old Muso Rant #2

I really don’t want this topic to become a regular feature so here are all my gripes in one go:

  1. Intrusive photographers (see Grumpy Old Muso Rant #1)
  2. Sound engineers – usually young – who turn the dynamics of perfectly good rock bands into crass drum’n’bass
  3. People who talk loudly during gigs, making you wonder if they’ve got in without paying
  4. Performers who spend more time regaling the audience with anecdotes than playing music
  5. Small venues that oversell when they get the chance, turning the evening into one long game of Sardines
  6. People who shout out, “Play something we know!”
  7. Tribute bands that churn the stuff out note for note when the originals probably never played it the same way twice
  8. Clapping along on the On Beat
  9. Perfectionists who get halfway through a number, make a mistake and then force you to listen to the whole thing all over again as if it’s your fault
  10. Performers dissatisfied with the turnout who blame the people who have turned out for not bringing their friends

There may be more but no list should ever exceed 10 items. By order. And if you’re thinking I’m rather hard to please, you could have a point. I was once thrown off an anger-management course for punching the organiser. He made the mistake of recommending we go see more live music …

Psychedelic-Lightshow